Posts Tagged ‘cheating at blackjack’

Blackjack cheaters caught in CA

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Every so often I like to report on news of people being caught cheating at blackjack. I do it for a reason: There isn’t a lot of blackjack news and it gives me something to write…No, not that. I do it because for some people, cheating at blackjack can be pretty tempting. With card counting, you can gain an advantage over the dealer, but if you play in such a way that you actually know which cards are coming, that tilts the odds even more in your favor.

I know there are reasons people cheat and I have even written about the psychology of cheating. There are two reasons you should not cheat at blackjack, though: First, cheating is wrong, no matter how you feel about the casino. Second, if you cheat you will most likely be caught. The penalty for cheating in a casino is pretty stiff.

That brings me to the news of three people arrested for allegedly cheating at blackjack in a California casino. According to authorities, they were caught marking cards and using those cards to win $24,000 after only playing for 30 minutes.

On July 12 at the Turlock Poker Room near San Francisco, Gabriel Urbieta Rodriguez started off the day by losing thousands at the blackjack table. Then his luck suddenly changed. He began playing three hands at a time and won almost every hand he played during a half-hour span. As you can imagine, the dealer became suspicious, so he switched to a new deck. Shortly thereafter, Rodriguez then got up from the table and left with his winnings.

A check of the security footage revealed that the cards in the original deck had been marked with “grease spots.” All cards worth 10 points had a grease mark on the outer edge of the cards and all other cards had a mark in the middle. Security footage also revealed that an individual named Cha Say also helped him, as did Robert Younan, the card room supervisor.

According to the casino, Younan made sure the marked deck was used at Rodriguez’s blackjack table. The casino has since confiscated the money won at the table and the three cheaters face felony charges and up to three months in prison. That sentence is actually pretty light, as cheating in a casino often carries a sentence of several years in prison.

So what is the moral of the story? Again, don’t cheat.

Cheating in Blackjack

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

I recently read an article online about the training of special agents in casinos who are tasked with identifying cheaters. The methodology in their training was very interesting, but my mind kept going back to the basic questions of why do people cheat and is it immoral to cheat?

Both questions are so intertwined that it’s impossible to fully discuss one without the other. First of all, I’ll point out that counting cards is not cheating if you do so using nothing but your mind. Using any sort of outside help, which can range from a digital counter to a rubber band, is cheating.

So why do some people cheat at blackjack and other casino games? First, let’s concede the fact that most people think of themselves as good people. Short of someone with a severe mental disorder, such as antisocial personality disorder, it’s virtually impossible to continue doing bad things, realize that they are bad, know that it makes you a bad person, and be okay with it.

People are not okay with thinking they’re a bad person. A person’s self-concept is formed at an early age and with the exception of extreme circumstances of abuse, as children we come to think of ourselves as good people. Doing bad things contradicts that positive self-image, forming cognitive dissonance, which is when someone holds onto two contradictory ideas simultaneously. One of the ways of resolving that dissonance is by rationalizing the bad behavior.

Yes, I had an affair, but my husband is never home and doesn’t love me anymore. Yes, I spent too much money on this house, but it’s an investment for the future. I would never abuse a child, but it’s the only way to keep him in line.

People invent justifications for their bad behavior that allow them to think of that behavior as okay. This allows them to see what they did not as something bad, but as something that was necessary or acceptable due to the circumstances. In this form of rationalization, they no longer see the bad behavior as being bad. In blackjack, it can take an “ends justifies the means” form, where the player is hurting for money and has bills that they can’t pay. They rationalize that I am only cheating because I need the money. I would never do it just to have extra money to spend on trivial things, but I have a family to support. That rationalization makes cheating not seem bad because not being able to support the family would be worse.

People also rationalize by comparing themselves to others with whom they match up favorably. This is done all of the time in the constructing and reinforcement of our self-image as a good person. We see ourselves as being good by recognizing that we are “better” than people we consider to be bad. After being accused of stealing, football player Peter Warrick protected his self-image by saying “it’s not like I shot the president.” Sure, being a thief is bad, but not as bad as being a murderer. People rationalize buying an expensive TV that they can’t afford by pointing out the average debt of American households. Sure, I might have spent too much, but not compared to those other people! Have you seen the size of our neighbor’s boat?

In this way, players can justify stealing from a casino because, compared to murder, rape, child abuse and countless other crimes, what they’re doing isn’t really that bad. Also, it’s not like the casino can’t afford it!

And that is probably the most common rationalization behind cheating at blackjack. Another way in which people resolve cognitive dissonance and preserve their self-image of a good person is by making the victim out to be the villain. That way they deserved it. Yes, I killed my wife, but she was having an affair. Yes, I lied on the witness stand, but I know that man was guilty.

Casinos are easy targets for this. Sure, they provide basically any amenity you can ask for, are a great place to have fun, and will willingly pay you when you win fair and square, but let’s face it, they’re greedy and like taking my money! People rationalize that since the casino takes everyone’s money and the games have odds unfairly tilted in the house’s favor, there’s nothing wrong with cheating them out of money. I’m like Robin Hood. I’m stealing from the rich and giving to..well, not the poor, but me! Since the games all have a house edge, people can see cheating as simply evening things out to make them fairer, ignoring the fact that anyone who gambles in a casino accepts the fact that a casino is a business that needs the revenue from gamblers to make money and stay in operation.

Though stealing something from another person is always equally bad, people are able to justify it so that it’s bad if you steal from someone poor but okay if you steal from the rich. It is much easier to rationalize stealing from a millionaire CEO than from a homeless person. Why? Because the rich person can afford it!  Look, it’s not like the casino will even miss this money. They have billions! In this weak economy, though, many casinos are losing money and some have even had to close. That doesn’t matter to the cheaters, though, who justify their actions by looking at the glitz and glamor of the casino and assume that they’re making money hand over fist. They can afford to lose this money. They have plenty of it and I’m barely scraping by.

The mind is a powerful thing. Through rationalization of bad behavior, people can resolve their cognitive dissonance and still see themselves as a good person. Sometimes they do so by justifying the bad behavior so it is no longer seen as bad, while other times they recognize that it was bad, but necessary. They hold onto their self-concept as a good person by admitting that sometimes a good person does bad things.

Dealer Pleads Guilty in Cheating Case

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

You know that old saying “crime doesn’t pay?” Well, sometimes it does. If it didn’t, then trust me, there would be a lot less crime. One of the deterrents for criminal activity, though, is that if you’re caught, you could be the one who pays. Such is the case now for a dirty blackjack dealer in Connecticut.

Jesus Rodriguez probably thought he had a pretty good deal. The Mohegan Sun dealer simply had to go about his day as normal, dealing cards for blackjack and baccarat, and whenever a certain criminal organization played at his table, he was to help them win. In exchange, he gets a cut. The problem is that the casino caught on.

Though I won’t go into detail about how the dealer cheated (I certainly don’t want to give anyone ideas), Rodriguez’s method involved what they call “false shuffles,” where the deck is played out normally and then the dealer shuffles in such a way that his co-conspirators can predict the order of the cards to be dealt.

Rodriguez pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy, where he allegedly helped the criminal organization bilk the casino out of more than $100,000. The former dealer faces up to five years in prison and a fun of up to $250,000. If you’re bad at math, let me point out that his fine is more than double what he allegedly stole. Therefore, even if he got to keep 100% of the stolen money (which he didn’t), it still would not have been worth the risk. I guess Rodriguez is not good at conducting a cost-benefit analysis.