Posts Tagged ‘psychology of cheating’

On Those Casino Pit Bosses

Friday, June 17th, 2011

If you have spent much time in a casino, you’ve seen the pit bosses walking around, keeping an eye on things. Even if you’re doing nothing wrong, you might find them intimidating. The truth is, though, those pit bosses and other personnel are there to help you as much as help the casino.

Casino management is very concerned with protecting the integrity of the casino. They want every game to be on the up and up so customers can have a good time and no one gets ripped off. For that reason, everyone is monitored. I do mean everyone. All of the players are being watched by someone, even if it’s just the “eye in the sky.” Most people already knew that. What they might not know is that each employee is being watched as well.

If you’re playing blackjack, that blackjack dealer is being monitored. The pit boss or other personnel are looking for a number of things. They are checking to make sure the dealer isn’t sloppy with the cards, which could expose their hole card or result in them dealing the wrong card. They are also making sure the dealer doesn’t cheat to help certain players.

The casino doesn’t want you to cheat the dealer, for obvious reasons, but they also don’t want the dealer to cheat you, whether intentionally or unintentionally. After all, if a casino develops a reputation for cheating players, it won’t last long. Of course, if you’re counting cards, the dealer, pit boss and everyone else is also looking out for that.

Blackjack Cheating Ringleader Convicted

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

Readers, I’ve said this many times, but I’ll say it again: Do not cheat at blackjack. I know that people have different reasons and justifications for cheating at a casino, but there are two very good reasons not to do it: 1) It’s morally wrong. 2) It’s not worth the risk.

Phuong Quoc Truong found that out the hard way. On Monday, the San Diego man was convicted of racketeering and was sentenced to 70 months (almost 6 years) in prison and will have to pay $5.7 million in restitution to the casinos and $2.8 million to the federal government. In addition, he has to forfeit two homes, property in Vietnam, his Porsche and other assets.

Truong was convicted of leading a criminal organization called the Tran Organization that bilked 27 tribal casinos out of approximately $7 million. According to the court, Truong led a gang of 37 people and used an organized system to defraud the casinos out of millions. They did so, in part, by using the “false shuffle” scam.

In the scam, members of the Tran Organization would bribe or intimidate blackjack and baccarat dealers into agreeing to be part of the conspiracy. Once they were on board, the dealer would do a false shuffle when given a certain signal. The dealer then leaves a certain part of the deck unshuffled, creating “slugs” of unshuffled cards. The dealer would then signal to the Tran members when the slugs are coming up in the deck and, knowing what order the cards are going to come in, they would bet accordingly. The Tran Organization also supposedly used hidden transmitters and computer software to track the order of cards.

Even though they spread their crimes out over 27 casinos instead of focusing on one, the authorities eventually noticed and the FBI made the arrests. Wanting to get rich, Truong now has to hand over most of his assets and spend the next 5+ years in prison.

Cheating in Blackjack

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

I recently read an article online about the training of special agents in casinos who are tasked with identifying cheaters. The methodology in their training was very interesting, but my mind kept going back to the basic questions of why do people cheat and is it immoral to cheat?

Both questions are so intertwined that it’s impossible to fully discuss one without the other. First of all, I’ll point out that counting cards is not cheating if you do so using nothing but your mind. Using any sort of outside help, which can range from a digital counter to a rubber band, is cheating.

So why do some people cheat at blackjack and other casino games? First, let’s concede the fact that most people think of themselves as good people. Short of someone with a severe mental disorder, such as antisocial personality disorder, it’s virtually impossible to continue doing bad things, realize that they are bad, know that it makes you a bad person, and be okay with it.

People are not okay with thinking they’re a bad person. A person’s self-concept is formed at an early age and with the exception of extreme circumstances of abuse, as children we come to think of ourselves as good people. Doing bad things contradicts that positive self-image, forming cognitive dissonance, which is when someone holds onto two contradictory ideas simultaneously. One of the ways of resolving that dissonance is by rationalizing the bad behavior.

Yes, I had an affair, but my husband is never home and doesn’t love me anymore. Yes, I spent too much money on this house, but it’s an investment for the future. I would never abuse a child, but it’s the only way to keep him in line.

People invent justifications for their bad behavior that allow them to think of that behavior as okay. This allows them to see what they did not as something bad, but as something that was necessary or acceptable due to the circumstances. In this form of rationalization, they no longer see the bad behavior as being bad. In blackjack, it can take an “ends justifies the means” form, where the player is hurting for money and has bills that they can’t pay. They rationalize that I am only cheating because I need the money. I would never do it just to have extra money to spend on trivial things, but I have a family to support. That rationalization makes cheating not seem bad because not being able to support the family would be worse.

People also rationalize by comparing themselves to others with whom they match up favorably. This is done all of the time in the constructing and reinforcement of our self-image as a good person. We see ourselves as being good by recognizing that we are “better” than people we consider to be bad. After being accused of stealing, football player Peter Warrick protected his self-image by saying “it’s not like I shot the president.” Sure, being a thief is bad, but not as bad as being a murderer. People rationalize buying an expensive TV that they can’t afford by pointing out the average debt of American households. Sure, I might have spent too much, but not compared to those other people! Have you seen the size of our neighbor’s boat?

In this way, players can justify stealing from a casino because, compared to murder, rape, child abuse and countless other crimes, what they’re doing isn’t really that bad. Also, it’s not like the casino can’t afford it!

And that is probably the most common rationalization behind cheating at blackjack. Another way in which people resolve cognitive dissonance and preserve their self-image of a good person is by making the victim out to be the villain. That way they deserved it. Yes, I killed my wife, but she was having an affair. Yes, I lied on the witness stand, but I know that man was guilty.

Casinos are easy targets for this. Sure, they provide basically any amenity you can ask for, are a great place to have fun, and will willingly pay you when you win fair and square, but let’s face it, they’re greedy and like taking my money! People rationalize that since the casino takes everyone’s money and the games have odds unfairly tilted in the house’s favor, there’s nothing wrong with cheating them out of money. I’m like Robin Hood. I’m stealing from the rich and giving to..well, not the poor, but me! Since the games all have a house edge, people can see cheating as simply evening things out to make them fairer, ignoring the fact that anyone who gambles in a casino accepts the fact that a casino is a business that needs the revenue from gamblers to make money and stay in operation.

Though stealing something from another person is always equally bad, people are able to justify it so that it’s bad if you steal from someone poor but okay if you steal from the rich. It is much easier to rationalize stealing from a millionaire CEO than from a homeless person. Why? Because the rich person can afford it!  Look, it’s not like the casino will even miss this money. They have billions! In this weak economy, though, many casinos are losing money and some have even had to close. That doesn’t matter to the cheaters, though, who justify their actions by looking at the glitz and glamor of the casino and assume that they’re making money hand over fist. They can afford to lose this money. They have plenty of it and I’m barely scraping by.

The mind is a powerful thing. Through rationalization of bad behavior, people can resolve their cognitive dissonance and still see themselves as a good person. Sometimes they do so by justifying the bad behavior so it is no longer seen as bad, while other times they recognize that it was bad, but necessary. They hold onto their self-concept as a good person by admitting that sometimes a good person does bad things.